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Alexander Haldane.

Only found details for one Alexander Haldane, there are two, any help would be appreciated.

 

Alexander Haldane 2

Leading seaman Alexander Haldane, Z/2643, Howe Battalion n. R.N. Div. Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, Born Dundee, Angus, Enlisted Lochgelly, Fife, Residence Lochgelly, Died of wounds 1st December 1917 aged 22, Grave reference V1. AA. 26.  Mendinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium.

Alexander Haldane was awarded the Victory and British medals, also the 15 Star, his family would have received the plaque (Dead man’s penny) and scroll from from King George V.

 

 

Alexander Haldane was born 1894, Dundee, Angus, the third of eleven children born to David Gibb Haldane occupation Masons Labourer, and Isabella Thomson.  David died 1907, and Isabella died 1934, both Lochgelly.

By 1911, Alexander Haldane 17, occupation miner, was living with his family at 23 Grainger Square, Lochgelly, Maggie (Family name?) 47, married 23 years and bearing 11 children all of whom survive, David 23, miner, Susan 20, pithead worker, James 18, coalminer, Frank 15, coalminer, Duncan 14, coalminer, Maggie 12, school, Janet 9, school, Joseph 8, school, Mary 6, school,

West Fife Echo 19th December 1917.

Mrs Haldane, Currie’s Buildings, Glencraig has been notified that her son, Leading Seaman Alexander Haldane, Royal Naval Division, has died of wounds received in action. Previously the Admiralty had telegraphed that he had been removed to a Casualty Clearing Station and was dangerously ill. Shortly after he arrived, he succumbed to his wounds. Deceased went through the Gallipoli campaign. His brother was killed in action in 1915.

West Fife Echo 30th October 1918.

In loving memory of my dear son Leading Seaman Alex Haldane, Royal Naval Division, who died of wounds in France on the 1st December 1917. Also, his brother James, Royal Scots, who was killed in action in France on the 27th August 1915. Deeply mourned.

Military details.

Enlisted 21/12/14; Draft for MEF 28/6/15, joined Howe Bn. 18/7/15-30/7/15 Diarrhoea, re-joined Howe Bn. 15/9/15-30/11/17 wounded.

CWGC = age 22; A Miner; b.1/2/1892 ; Next-of-Kin & home address: Mother, Mrs. David Haldane, Currie’s Buildings, Glencraig, Lochgelly.

Cause of death, Died of wounds at 12.45am in 64th Casualty Clearing Station (GSW Head penetrating 30/11/17)

 Death Certificate.

 

 

 

 

James Haldane.

Private James Haldane, 11766, 11th Battalion The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) Born Dundee, Angus, Enlisted Glencraig, Fife, Residence Lochgelly, Killed in action 27th August 1915, Grave reference H.11. Cambrin Churchyard Extension. Pas de Calais, France. Also commemorated on the family headstone in Lochgelly Cemetery.

 


 

 

 

Private James Haldane was awarded the British and Victory medals also the 15 Star, his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

Posted to France 6th May 1915.

James Thomson Haldane was born 1892 in Dundee, Angus the fourth of eleven children born to David Gibb Haldane occupation Masons Labourer, and Isabella Thomson.  David died 1907, and Isabella died 1934, both Lochgelly.

By 1911, James Haldane 18, occupation miner, was living with his family at 23 Grainger Square, Lochgelly, Maggie (Family name?) 47, married 23 years and bearing 11 children all of whom survive, David 23, miner, Susan 20, pithead worker, Alexander 17, coalminer, Frank 15, coalminer, Duncan 14, coalminer, Maggie 12, school, Janet 9, school, Joseph 8, school, Mary 6, school,

Draft Record.

James Haldane 11766, joined the Royal Scots on the 8th day of August 1914, at Glencorse, Edinburgh, aged 20 years and 27 days.  Height 5ft 6ins, 141lbs, 38inch chest, Fresh complexion, Grey eyes, Brown hair, scar over right eye.  Next of kin Mother, Mrs Isabella Thomson Haldane, Curries Buildings, Lochgelly, killed in action 10th September 1915, total service 1 years, 20 days.

Cowdenbeath Advertiser and Lochgelly Times 1st September 1915.

Mrs Haldane, Glencraig, has just received intimation that her son, Private James Haldane, 11th Royal Scots, has been killed in action in France.  Private Haldane was a well-known footballer, and had signed on for Lochgelly United.  Formerly he played for the Hearts of Beath, and previous to joining Lochgelly several clubs were anxious to secure his services.  He enlisted in the Royal Scots immediately war broke out.  He had already served four years in the Territorials.  Private Haldane has another two brothers on active service in the Dardanelles, and another brother in France.

James Haldane (19 December 1890 – 27 August 1915) was a Scottish professional footballer who played in the Scottish league  for Lochgelly United He was killed in action during the First World War  Personal life
Soon after the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914, Herbertson enlisted as a private in the Royal Scots He was  killed in action in France on 27 August 1915 and buried in Cambrin Churchyard Extension.

Dunfermline Journal September 4th 1915.

Glencraig Man’s Heroic Death, Mrs Haldane, Currie’s Building, Glencraig, (By Lochgelly) who has four sons on active service, has received word of the death of one of them in France, namely James, who was serving with the 11th Battalion Royal Scots.  The intimation was received by a letter from Captain Wemyss-Campbell who wrote thus: – “It is with deep regret that I have to announce to you the death of your son, who was in my company, he was killed instantaneously in the trenches last night, and at the very moment when he had generously gone to the help of a wounded comrade.  He was a fine man whom we can ill spare, and who will be much missed by us all.  Our sincere sympathy goes out to you, and I can only say that you can feel that he died at the post of duty serving his King and country, faithfully to the end.  With my own personal sympathy to you I am sad” ?.  Mrs Haldane also received a letter of sympathy from Lieutenant Colonel R.C. Dundee who commands the battalion.  Private John Steedman in a letter to the deceased soldier brother , gives more details of the circumstances that led to Private Haldane’ death. He says “I have very bad news to break to you. Your brother Jim was killed in the trenches here last night (August 27th) He suffered none as he died instantaneously. The story is this, we were out front in a working party digging a trench when suddenly the Germans opened fire on us with rifles and machine guns.  A chap in front of Jim was hit in two places and was in great pain.  Jim heard him cry for help, he went out to bring his wounded comrade in.  He was in the act of doing so when he was hit.  Jim laid down his life for his comrade, it cast a gloom over all of us for he was well liked in the company, and had many friends.  He was buried in the village churchyard, and I attended the burial today.  I know how you will miss him at home but you will have to cheer up.  You will have the satisfaction that he died doing his duty for King and country, I feel sorry at his ultimate end.  He was a good soldier, and we miss him but I know you will miss him more than we.  He lies alongside other heroes, and a man can make no greater sacrifice than to lay down his life for his comrade.  Jim and I made it up between us when we came out here that if one of us fell the other would break the news to those at home.  I am thus fulfilling his wishes.  This is a terrible war, and there will be many sad homes before it is ended.  His comrades wish to express their deepest sympathy to all at home.  His grave will be well looked after, with deepest sympathy “from his chum” Private Haldane was well known in football circles having played for some time with Hearts of Beath.  He had signed on for Lochgelly United when war broke out.  Mrs Haldane has also been informed officially that another son (Alex) has been admitted to hospital in Egypt suffering from Enteric(?) fever.

West Fife Echo 15th September 1915.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fifeshire Advertiser 11th September 1915.

Mrs Haldane, Glencraig, has received intimation that her son Private James Haldane 11th Royal Scots, has been killed in France.  Private Haldane was a well-known footballer and had signed on for Lochgelly United.  He enlisted in the Royal Scots immediately war broke out.  He had already served four years in the Territorials.  Private Haldane has two other brothers on active service in the Dardanelles, and another brother in France.

Dundee Evening Telegraph 7th September 1915.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fife Free Press 11th September 1915.

Mrs Haldane, Glencraig, has received intimation that her son Private James Haldane 11th Royal Scots, has been killed in France.  Private Haldane was a well-known footballer and had signed on for Lochgelly United.  He enlisted in the Royal Scots immediately war broke out.  He had already served four years in the Territorials.  Private Haldane has two other brothers on active service in the Dardanelles, and another brother in France.

UK Registers of Soldiers Effects.

 

 

 

 

Family Headstone Lochgelly Cemetery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Hamilton

Captain William Harrison, 183rd Tunneling Company, Royal Engineers, born Dalziel, Lanarkshire, Enlisted Fife, Resided Uddingston, Lanarkshire, Died 14th August 1917, Grave reference 111. F.2. Dozinghem Military Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. ( Also commemorated on the family headstone in Bothwell Park Cemetery, near Uddingston)

 

CWGC

 

 

 

Captain William would have been awarded the Victory and British medals, his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

William Hamilton was born 24th February 1885 at 94 Caledonian Street, Motherwell, the second of at least nine children born to James Hamilton occupation Cashier at Iron works, and Jeanie Jolly.  Father James died 1940 aged 83, Mother Jeanie died 1935 aged 77. They had been married 52/53 years.

Fife Free Press 25th August 1917.

Captain Wm Hamilton, Royal Engineers, is reported killed in action.  Captain Hamilton was for two years was assistant manager of Lochgelly Iron and Coal Company.  Before enlisting which, he did in October 1914.  He joined the Lovat Scouts as a private, afterwards transferring to the Royal Engineers, where he received a commission, he took a great interest in sport, and was connected with various athletic societies in Lochgelly.  He belonged to Coatbridge.

Bellshill Speaker 9th February 1917.

Captain James Hamilton of the 10th Battalion Scottish Rifles, and who was temporarily to the Royal Engineers had been killed in action in France on the 1st Ultimo.  Captain Hamilton was the third son of Mr James Hamilton, , who had been a member of the council for a number of years and who acted as their chairman for a term.  He was one of five sons who were fighting in their country’s battles in France or Egypt.

Bellshill Speaker 31st August 1917.

It is with much regret that we announce that news has been received to the effect that Captain Wm Hamilton, son of Mr James Hamilton, J.P. manager Carnbroe Ironworks, and recently chairman of Bothwell Parish Council, has fallen in action.  Captain Hamilton was a mining engineer and was in charge of an Engineering Tunneling Corps.  What makes the circumstance al the more regrettable is the fact that this is the second son that Mr Hamilton has lost in the terrible war.  Other three sons are with the colours.

UK Records of Soldiers Effects.

Died due to a motor accident

 

 

 

Battle of the Somme. An officer of 183 Tunneling Company, Royal Engineers, looks warily over the top. His men had dug and detonated the large mine blown at Kasino Point, near Carnoy. Private collection of Richard van Emden who wrote the book: The Somme, The Epic Battle in the Soldiers’ Own Words and Photographs.

The 183rd Tunnelling Company was one of the tunnelling companies of the

Royal Engineers created by the British Army during World War I. The tunnelling units were occupied in offensive and defensive mining involving the placing and maintaining of mines under enemy lines, as well as other underground work such as the construction of deep dugouts for troop accommodation, the digging of subways, saps (a narrow trench dug to approach enemy trenches), cable trenches and underground chambers for signals and medical services.

 

 

Family Headstone. (poor quality photo)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Hammond.

Private James Hammond, 3/6906, 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders, Born Blantyre, Lanarkshire, Enlisted Lochgelly, Fife, Residence Lochgelly, Killed in action 16th December 1914, Grave reference I.H.11. Rue-David Military Cemetery Fleurbaix, Pas de Calais, France. Previous service with Black Watch, Royal Highlanders, enlisted 1893 aged 18, Army number 5238.

 

CWGC

 

Pte James Hammond was awarded the British, and Victory medal, also the 14 Star with clasp, his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

Posted to France 19th October 1914.

 

 

The 1914 Star, also known as the Mons Star, was a campaign medal of the British Empire, for service in World War One.  This Bronze Star was authorised in April, 1917, to be awarded to those who served in France or Belgium on the strength of a unit, or service in either of those countries between 5th August and midnight on 22nd/23rd November 1914.  The former date is the day after Britain’s declaration of war against the Central Powers, and the closing date marks the end of the First Battle of Ypres.

Recipients were officers and men of the pre-war British Army, specifically the British Expeditionary Force (B.E.F or the Old Contemptibles), who landed in France soon after the outbreak of the War and who took part in the Retreat from Mons (hence the nickname ‘Mons Star’). 365,622 were awarded in total.  Recipients of this medal also received the British War Medal and Victory Medal. These three medals were sometimes irreverently referred to as Pip, Squeak and Wilfred.

James Hammond was born 23rd June 1874, Blantyre, Lanarkshire, the fourth of nine children born to Peter Hammond occupation coal miner and Ann Moran.  Peter died 1903, Ballingry, and Ann died 1919, Lochgelly.

James Hammond 29 occupation miner, married Maggie Gilvary 22, 1904 Auchterderran. Children from marriage, Peter Hammond 1/5/1904, William Hammond 25/6/1905, Annie Hammond 5/10/1906, Maggie Hammond 13/11/1908, James Hammond 3/10/1910, Winifred Hammond 18/11/1914.

1911 census.

James Hammond 29, occupation miner, was living with his family at 22 Melville Street, Lochgelly, family were, Maggie 29, married 7 years and bearing 5 children all of whom survive, Peter 6, William 5, Annie 4, Maggie 2, James 6m.

Draft Record.

On the 8th day Sept 1914 James Hammond, 37 years 66 days, occupation miner, enlisted in the 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders.  Military history, 28 days at home 72 days with B.E.F. 72 days, total 100 days.  Next of kin Maggie McGilvary, Height 5ft 4 3/4  ins, Weight 140lbs, Chest 39, Complexion Fresh, Eyes Grey, Hair Brown, Roman Catholic.  Mrs Hammond awarded pension of 26/6 on 12th July 1915,

Brothers of soldier, Andrew 45, John 22, Bernard 40, Sisters of Soldier, Margaret 60(?) Mary Ann 36, Declared by Mrs Maggie Hammond 42 Well Street, Partick, Glasgow, dated 7th July 1919.

Fife Free Press 2nd January 1915.

Shot Through The Heart, Private James Hammond, Gordon Highlanders, Lochgelly, has been reported killed in action.  Private Hammond served through the African War, and also took part at the charge of Dargai.  In a letter to his widow the Captain of his company says that Private Hammond was shot through the heart, and was buried in the grounds of a monastery. A small cross was erected over his grave.

UK Registers of Soldiers Effects.

 

 

 

2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders.

Over Christmas and New Year 1914/15, a series of unofficial truces took place at various points on the Western Front.  Soldiers from both sides fraternised openly, exchanging gifts, food and souvenirs.  The dead were collected and buried.  Trenches were reinforced.  Both 2nd and 6th Gordons were involved, but 1st Gordons were not.  In some sectors the truce lasted only a day or so; in others, it was only at the specific insistence of the High Command that normal hostilities resumed in January.  Diaries and letters home recorded the events. 2nd and 6th Gordons had very different experiences. This unique photograph shows men of the 2nd Battalion with German soldiers in no-man land.

We’ve been at peace for two days now, hob-nobbing with the Germans half-way across the front and they are only 250 yards away and to see us all in the space between shaking hands, wishing happy greetings and all that, was amazing.  It started yesterday, in the morning, and has gone on ever since with us, though they are firing on our right and left.  The pipes were playing, cheers, cigars, cigarettes and chocolate handed all round.

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Robert Henderson.

Driver Robert Henderson, M2/105385, No 4, Army Service Corps, Born Symington, Lanarkshire, Enlisted Cowdenbeath, Fife, Residence Lochgelly, Killed in action 13th November 1917, Grave reference E.5. Adinkerke Military Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

 

 

CWGC

 

 

 

Pte Robert Henderson was awarded the British, and Victory medal, also the 15 Star. his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

Posted to France 15th September 1915.

Robert Henderson was born 27th July 1897, Symington, Lanarkshire, son of William Henderson occupation general labourer, and Mary Brodie.  Mary died 1922 Lochgelly, William died 1913 Lochgelly aged 51.

In the 1911 census Robert Henderson 13, at school, was living with his family in Lochgelly, family were William Henderson 48, occupation General Labourer, Mary 46, married 14 years and bearing 5 children all of whom survive, James 19, step son, Robert 13, Alexander 11, William 9, David 6, Stewart 4.

Hamilton Advertiser 8th December 1917.

Henderson- Killed in France 13th November (result of enemy air raid) driver Robert Henderson aged 20, M.T.A.S.C. dearly beloved son of Mr Mrs Henderson Lochgelly, late of Hare-stanes, Dolphinton, inserted by his brother John.

Dunfermline Journal 1st December 1917.

Driver Robert Henderson, Mechanical Transport, Lochgelly, has been killed in action.  He was only 20 years of age, and was a baker to trade, he had been over two years at the front.

U.K. Registers of Soldiers Effects.

Father Robert received £3/9/11 on 23rd Feb 1918, and £11/0/0 on 20th Nov 1919.

 

 

The Royal Army Service Corps (RASC) was a former corps of the British Army. It was responsible for land, coastal and lake transport; air dispatch; supply of food, water, fuel, and general domestic stores such as clothing, furniture and stationery (but not ammunition and military and technical equipment, which were the responsibility of the Royal Army Ordnance Corps); administration of barracks; the Army Fire Service; and provision of staff clerks to headquarters units.

 

 

James Henderson

James Henderson is also commemorated on the Cowdenbeath War Memorial, record can be found there

https://cowdenbeathwarmemorial.wordpress.com/h/

 

 

John Henderson.

Corporal John Henderson, 3/3381, 8th (Service) Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) Born Perth, Enlisted Lochgelly, Fife, Residence Lochgelly, Killed in action 18th July 1916, Grave reference XXX.F.1. Serre Road Cemetery No 2, Somme, France.

 

CWGC

 

 

Corp John Henderson was awarded the British, and Victory medal, also the 15 Star. his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

Posted to France 10th May 1915.

John Henderson was born 11th February 1895, in Perth, Perthshire, son of John Henderson occupation miner and Margaret Sinclair McLaren (married 1889, Cowdenbeath) Father died 1940, Mother died 1930, both Lochgelly.

In the 1911 census John Henderson 16, occupation miner, was living with his family at 62 Melville Street, Lochgelly, John 43, miner, Maggie 39, married 22 years and bearing 12 children 6 of whom survive, Dugald 13, Andrew 7, Thomas 6, Robert 3, Athol 8m.

Dunfermline Press 18th August 1916.

Mrs Henderson, 62 Melville Street, Lochgelly, has received news that her son Private John Henderson, Royal Highlanders, has been killed in action.

Soldiers Will.

In the event of my death I leave all my property effects to my Mother Mrs Henderson, 62 Melville Street, Lochgelly.

UK Registers of Soldiers Effects.

 

 

 

The 8th Battalion Black Watch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Herriot.

(Robert Heriot on memorial)

Care with this record as Robert Herriot is the only Scots Guards soldier found, which meant he would have been misspelt on the Lochgelly War Memorial and also CWGC entry. He must have had some sort of link to Lochgelly as he enlisted there.

Guardsman Robert Herriot, 9673, 1st Battalion Scots Guard, Born Leith, Midlothian, Enlisted Lochgelly, Fife, Residence Larbert, Stirlingshire, Killed in action 12th March 1915, Grave reference 11. A.17. Le Touret Military Cemetery Richebourg-L’avoue, Pas de Calais, France.

 

CWGC

 

 

Gdsm Robert Herriot, was awarded the British, and Victory medal, also the 14 Star. his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.
Posted to France 28th December 1914.

 

Robert Herriot was born 2nd March 1895, Leith, Midlothian, son of George occupation General Labourer, and Christina McCallum, George died in 1906,.and Christina died 1905, both Leith.

Robert Herriot’s sister Christina married David Cairns in 1911, Robert probably lived with his sister and brother in law probably in Larbert, Stirlingshire.

UK Registers of Soldiers Effects.

Pte Robert Herriott 9673, 1st Battalion Scots Guards, Brother-in-law G Legates (?)David Cairns Christina Cairns received £5/2/1. on 25th June 1915, David Cairns Christina Cairns received £5/0/0 on 9th August 1919.

 

 

 

Soldiers Will

In the event of my death I leave all my property/effects to my sister and brother in law, Christina and David Cairns.

 

Battle Neuve Chapelle 10-14 March 1915.  March 10: First Attack and German Response

At 0800 on March 10, after a frantic half-hour of shelling, the assault began. Some troops, such as the 2/39th Garhwal Rifles and 2nd Lincolns, quickly cleared their target trenches. Elsewhere, entire units were mowed down by German fire. Commanders assumed these assaults had succeeded because no men came back. They were all dead or too badly wounded to retreat.

Meanwhile, a barrage pounded the Germans beyond the front line, to stop them entering the fray. This had the unfortunate side-effect of preventing further advances by the successful Allied troops.
The German plan to counter a breakthrough was to consolidate the flanks before filling the gap. They had some success; the 11th Jäger Battalion was putting up stiff resistance on the British left. However, the British persisted, driving back the Jägers.

March 11: Renewed Attack

The next morning, the British went back on the offensive. This time things were tougher. Thanks to the advances of the previous day and the digging in that had followed, the trench lines had moved. Information previously used to direct the artillery was out of date. Fog prevented them from seeing how the land now lay. Precious shells were spent pounding empty fields.

On the front line, information was also a problem. The 1st Grenadier Guards misidentified their location, leading to more wasted artillery. Units failed to communicate with those beside them. With orders coming separately from the Indian Corps and the IV Corps, there was little coordination. Information had to pass all the way up the lines and then back down for it to spread. Amid this chaos, the Germans held up the British. As night fell, their VII Corps joined the front line, to provide further resistance. March 12th

On the third day, both sides planned to advance.
The Germans seized the initiative. An artillery bombardment at 0430 was followed by an infantry advance at 0500. Their shelling was no more effective than the British had been the day before. With the British troops well dug in, the Germans faced strong resistance and were cut down.

Now the British began their last great assault of the battle. It was another uncoordinated affair. The 2nd Scots Guards, having taken a German position, had to withdraw after being shelled by their own side. It took four hours for news to reach headquarters that the German advance had stopped and they could launch a full offensive. The artillery, still reorganising after the previous day, could not manage full bombardments until well into the afternoon.
Advances were made, and more ground was taken, but the skies were overcast, and dusk came bringing an end to the attack. The British secured what they had taken.

 

 

Alexander Hook.

Private Alexander Hook, S/7576, 1st Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) Born Edinburgh, Midlothian, Enlisted Lochgelly, Fife, Residence Lochgelly, Killed in action 9th May 1915, Grave reference Panels 24 to 26 Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

 

CWGC

 

Pte Alexander Hook was awarded the British, and Victory medal, also the 15 Star. his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

Posted to France 22nd February 1915.

 

Alexander Hook was born 13th July 1886, Edinburgh, the fourth of six children born to David Hook occupation Railway Carter, and Ann Graham.  David died 1923 Ratho, and Ann died 1928 Edinburgh.

On the 5th April 1907, Alexander Hook 20, occupation miner, married Margaret Janet Nicoll 26, in 35 Shandon Crescent, Edinburgh.

In the 1911 census Alexander Hook 24, occupation miner was living with his family at 19 Kennard Street, Lochgelly, family were, Margaret married 3 years and bearing 3 children of whom 3 survive, David 3, Margaret 2, Janet 3m.

Army Pension.

Alexander Hook enlisted in the Army Service Corps 24th November 1914, army number 026557, aged 28 years and 4 months, address 22 Melville Street, Lochgelly, occupation miner, Height 6ft, Chest 38ins, Next of kin Mrs Alexander Hook, same address.  Married Margaret Jane Nicoll 5th April 1907, Edinburgh, Children, David 28th June 1907, Margaret 19th January 1909, James 21 December 1910, Alexander 28th December 1912.  Discharged army regulation Para 392.111.C. 26th November 1914. (Recruit within three months of enlistment considered unfit for service)

Dundee Courier 18th May 1915.

Lochgelly has been hard hit during the recent fighting, no fewer than 3 men killed and 5 wounded, Private Hook, Black Watch, Private J Mackay, Royal Engineers, Private John Ball, Black Watch. (Same entry in Scotsman and Dunfermline Press)

UK Registers of Soldiers Effects.

 

 

Soldiers Will

In the event of death I leave all my property and effects to my wife Mrs M Hook, 22 Melville Street, Lochgelly.

On the 9th of May 1st Battalion Black Watch was stationed at Rue de Bois Richebourg.

 

The Battle of Aubers Ridge 9th May 1915.

5.30am: British bombardment intensifies, field guns switch to HE and also fire at breastworks. The lead battalions of the two assaulting Brigades of 1st Division go over the top to take up a position only 80 yards from German front. (2nd Brigade has 1/Northants and 2/Royal Sussex in front and 2/KRRC and 1/5th Royal Sussex in immediate support; 3rd Brigade has 2/Royal Munster Fusiliers and 2/Welsh in front, with 1/4th Royal Welsh Fusiliers in support). Heavy machine-gun fire cuts the attackers down even on their own ladders and parapet steps, but men continue to press forward as ordered.

5.40am: British bombardment lifts off front lines and advances 600 yards; infantry assault begins. Despite the early losses and enemy fire the three Brigades attempted to advance across No Man’s Land. They were met by intense crossfire from the German machine-guns, which could not be seen in their ground-level and strongly protected emplacements. Whole lines of men were seen to be hit. Few lanes had been cut in the wire and even where men reached it they were forced to bunch, forming good targets for the enemy gunners. The leading battalions suffered very significant losses, particularly among officers and junior leaders. Around 100 men on the Northants and Munsters got into the German front, but all were killed or captured. The advance of the supporting battalions suffered similarly, and by 6.00am the advance had halted, with hundreds of men pinned down in No Man’s Land, unable to advance or fall back.

More than 11,000 British casualties were sustained on 9 May 1915, the vast majority within yards of their own front-line trench. Mile for mile, Division for Division, this was one of the highest rates of loss during the entire war.

 

 

William Bryce Hugh.

Private William Bryce Hugh, 55958, K Company Royal Army Medical Corps, Born Lochgelly, Fife, Enlisted Hamilton, Lanarkshire, Residence Wishaw, Died 14th March 1915, Grave reference AF. 1830. Aldershot Military Cemetery, Hampshire, England.


CWGC

William Bryce Hugh was not awarded any medals as he never served abroad or was sent to any war zone.

William Hugh was born 15th January 1886, 4 Mid Street, Lochgelly, 2nd oldest son of Robert Hugh occupation Publican, and Betsy Simpson.  Father Robert died 1910 Lochgelly, aged 50. Mother Betsy died 1935 at Murray’s Royal Asylum in Perth, aged 75.

Draft record.

On the 17th February 1915 William Bryce Hugh 29, c/o Mrs Rankin, 53 Bellevue Terrace, Wishaw, army number 55958, occupation Chemist Assistant, enlisted in the Royal Army Medical Corps, at Hamilton.  Next of kin Mrs Betsy Simpson Hugh, Burgh Buildings, Lochgelly.  Brothers Thomas 37, Robert 30, James 23.  Height 5ft 33/4 ins, 291/2  Chest,

William enlisted on 17th February 1915. He was 29 years old and a Chemist Assistant by trade. He was admitted into Cambridge Hospital with bronchitis on 8th March 1915. He was the son of Robert and Betsy Simpson Hugh of 40 Church Street, Lochgelly, Fife.

UK Registers of Soldiers Effects.

Pte William Bryce Hugh 55958, R.A.M.C. died of Bronchitis, Mother Betsy received £2/17/8. on 24th Nov 1915.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Andrew Hugh.

Private Andrew Hugh, 59653, 17th Battalion The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) Formerly 2887 Lanarkshire Yeomanry, Born Lochgelly, Fife, Enlisted Lochgelly Residence Lochgelly, Died of wounds 4th October 1918, Grave reference 1V.E.34. Terlincthun British Cemetery Wimille. Pas de Calais, France.

 

 

CWGC

 

 

 

Pte Andrew Hugh was awarded the British, and Victory medals, his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

 

Andrew Hugh was born 25th April 1886, Lochgelly, the 5th of 7 children born to Alexander Hugh occupation Grocer and Mary Ann Brand.  Mary died 1923 Lochgelly, and Alexander died 1934 Lochgelly.

Andrew Hugh 19 occupation Grocers Assistant married Isabella Whyte Dewar 19, 1906, in Auchterderran.  Isabella died 1951 Lochgelly.

In 1911, Andrew Hugh 24, occupation Grocers Assistant was living with his family at 108 Auchterderran, Isabella 24, married 5 years and bearing 2 children both of whom survive, Grace,5  Mary 4.

Draft Record.

Enlisted in 2/1 Lanarkshire Yeomanryth September 1916, Perth, age 29 years 8 months, Transferred to Royal Scots 24th February 1917, age 30, occupation Crosshill Tavern Manager? Height 5ft 41/4 ins, 134 lbs, 38 chest, Personal effects, Dice, Pipe, Mirror, Teeth, Pencils, Badge, Pouch, Parts of razor, Cigarette case, Purse, Next of kin Mrs Isabella Hugh, 108 Auchterderran Road, children Grace 7/5/1906, Mary 8/10/1907, Father Alexander Hugh 4 Erskine St, Lochgelly.  Place of death 13 General Hospital France, Pension 25/5 pence per week.

Dunfermline Press 12th October 1918

Private Andrew Hugh, Royal Scots, (severely wounded) is a son of councillor Alex Hugh, Auchterderran Road, Lochgelly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

UK Registers of Soldiers Effects

Pte Andrew Hugh 59653, 17th Batt Royal Scots, died of wounds 13th General Hospital France. Widow Isabella received £8/11/11. on 8th April 1919 and £8/0/0 on 15th Dec 1919.

 

 

 

17th (Service) Battalion (Rosebery’s): Formed Edinburgh, February 1915 as a Bantam Battalion; Glencorse, April 1915; Selkirk, May 1915; Masham, June 1915 serving with 106th Brigade; 35th Division; France and Flanders, February 1916. Most of this battalion’s latter service was in the Ypres area although the unit was called to help quell riots in Calais during January 1919 before being disbanded around April 1919.

 

 

Bartn Hughes.

Private Bartholomew Hughes, 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, Born Falls of Fire, Inverness, Inverness-shire, Enlisted Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Residence Lochgelly, Fife, Killed in action 30th June 1915, Grave reference panels 192 to 197, Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, Turkey.

 

CWGC

 

 

 

Private Bartn Hughes was awarded the British, and Victory medal, also the 15 Star. his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

Posted to the Balkans 19th May 1915.

 

Bartholomew Hughes was born 21st September 1897, in Inverness, the 4th of ten children born to Patrick Hughes, occupation Navies Foreman and hutkeeper, and Catherine O’Neill.  Patrick died 1943 in Kirkcaldy, Catherine died 1957.

By 1911, Bartholomew Hughes was living a working men’s house at 80 Temple Place, Lochgelly, owned by his Father Patrick, family were Patrick 40, Lodging House owner, Catherine 40, married 19 years and bearing 10 children 7 of whom survive, John 17, Deputy house keeper, Patrick 15, Michael 11, Bridget 8, Thomas 5, Mary 2.  The valuation rolls of 1925/1930/1935 shows Patrick owning a lodging house at 157 Station Road, Lochgelly.

Entry on Lochgelly Scottish Military Research Group site.

HUGHES, Bartholomew Private 17469 1st Bn Royal Dublin Fusiliers
Born: Falls of Fire, Inverness Enlisted: Glasgow.
Age: 17 Date of Death: 29/06/1915 Cause: Killed in action.
Family Notes: Son of Patrick and Catherine Hughes, of Tempe House, Lochgelly, Fife.
Other notes: Private Hughes’s Medal Index Card shows him as entering the Gallipoli Theatre of Operations on 19/5/1915.
Census notes: The 1901 Scottish Census shows the Hughes family (residing at, New Docks’ G’mouth Hut No 1, Grangemouth, Inverness) as follows; Patrick (Born Ireland; Navvies Foreman & Hut keeper, aged 33) and Catherine (aged 31) and their children, John (aged 9), Mary (aged 7), Patrick (aged 5), Bartholomew (aged 3), Sarah (aged 2) and Michael (aged 1).
Special Notes: Private Hughes is listed on the IWM records and Soldiers Died (Part 73) and his Medal Index Card with his date of death shown as “30/6/15;” the CWGC shows the date as “29/6/15”.
Grave/Memorial: Panel 190 to 196. Helles Memorial.
Other memorials: Private Hughes is commemorated on the Lochgelly War Memorial (located in front of the Parish Church), Bank Street, Lochgelly, Fife; he is also named in the Scottish Roll of Honour in the Scottish National War Memorial, Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh.
Irish War Memorial Records Page No: Volume IV, Page 204.

West Fife Echo 4th August 1915.

Private Bartholomew Hughes, Royal Dublin Fusiliers, Temple House, Lochgelly, has been killed in action at the Dardanelles.  Official word says he met his death on the 30th June.  Private Hughes who is only 17 years of age, enlisted just before Christmas and was shortly afterwards sent to the Dardanelles.  He has a brother John in the same battalion who is also fighting in the Dardanelles.

UK Registers of Soldiers Effects.

Pte Bartholomew Hughes 17469, 1st Batt Royal Dublin Fusiliers, Father Patrick received £3/8/5 for self and Bro and Sis, Father Patrick received £3/0/0. on 12th August 1919

 

 

 

28 June 1915. Their next major action was at Gully Ravine and commenced on 28 June, ending on 2 July. During the battle of Gully Ravine, General Hunter-Weston attempted to advance north along the western Gallipoli coastline, and thereby shorten the line of the salient at the centre of his front line. Though the initial attack took all its objectives, on the two following nights the Turks launched concerted counter-attacks during which the 1st Dublin’s suffered enormous casualties, the battalion losing on 28th – 29th June 236 officers and men killed, wounded and missing.

 

 

Alexander Hunter.

Private Alexander Hunter, S/20331, 6th Battalion Gordon Highlanders, Born Auchterderran, Fife, Enlisted Dunfermline, Residence Lochgelly, died of wounds 18th April 1918, Grave reference B1. Y Farm Military Cemetery Bois-Grenier, Nord, France.


CWGC

 

 

Private Alexander Hunter was awarded the British, and Victory medals, his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

 

 

Alexander Hunter was born 19th December 1898, Auchterderran, Fife, the youngest of seven children born to James Hunter, occupation coal miner, and Margaret Danks Westwater, Margaret died 1937, Lochgelly, James died 1949, Lochgelly.

In 1911, Alexander Hunter 12, school, was living with his family at 30 Francis Street, Lochgelly, James 54, miner, Margaret 56, married 31 years and bearing 7 children of whom 7 survive, James 22, teacher, Isabella 17, factory worker, Stewart 16, tailor’s apprentice.

UK Registers of Soldiers Effects.

Pte Alexander Hunter 20331, /6th Batt Gordon Highlanders, Mother Margaret received £12/6/2. on 4th April 1919.

 

 

 

Soldiers Will.

In the event of my death I leave all my property and effects to my Mother Mrs Margaret Hunter, 3 Francis Street, Lochgelly.

Alexander Hunter died of wounds at the Spring Offensive of 1918.

The second phase of the German offensive, Operation Georgette (also known as the Battle of the Lys), was launched in French Flanders on 9 April and for Ludendorff it was a question of double or quits. The battle started with success similar to its immediate predecessor. A spectacular breakthrough on the Lys was quickly followed by the capture of Estaires (9-10 April), which was subsequently burned to the ground, and Messines Ridge (10-11 April). An advance fizzled out near Hazebrouck, an important railway junction (12-15 April) and was followed by the destruction and capture of Baillieu (12-15 April). The First Battle of Kemmel Hill (17-19 April) put a stop to another advance, this time towards Bethune, and the Germans vented the full force of their frustration on the town’s centre. Several British divisions did their best to check the German advance with the sparse means at their disposal (barricading the streets of Armentières with whatever they could find.

 

 

Alexander Hunter.

Private Alexander Hunter, 266602, 6th (Perthshire) Battalion (Territorial) Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) Previously 4186, Born Lochgelly, Fife, Enlisted Lochgelly, Residence Lochgelly, killed in action 23rd April 1917, Grave reference I.E.34. Brown’s Copse Cemetery, Roeux, Pas de Calais, France.


 

 

 

Private Alexander Hunter was awarded the British, and Victory medals, his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

 

Alexander Hunter was born 25th April 1895, Lochgelly, Fife, son of William Hunter occupation coal miner and Isabella McKinley. William died 22nd June 1925, Lochgelly, and Isabella died 21st December 1925.
In 1911, Alexander 15 was living with his family in Lochgelly, William 58, occupation coal miner, Isabella 56, married 32 years and bearing 13 children 9 of whom survive, William 22, miner, Peter 21, miner, David 20, miner, Isabella 19, Draper’s ass, Thomas 14, Baker.

Dunfermline Press 12th May 1917.

Private Alex Hunter, Black Watch, Lochgelly, is reported to have been killed in action. Private Hunter, who enlisted fifteen months ago, was a Draper with Lochgelly, Co-operative Society.

UK Registers of Soldiers Effects.

Pte Alexander Hunter 266602, 1/6th Royal Highlanders, Father William received £2/12/4. on 30th Aug 1917, and £5/0/0. on 29th Oct 1919.

 

 

 

The next major action was in the opening day of the offensive at Arras, commencing in snow on 9 April 1917. The British Third Army attacked at Arras in compliance with a directive from the new French Commander in Chief, General Robert Nivelle. It was to be a curtain raiser for a larger French attack to the south, along the Chemin des Dames. The Division was part of the opening attack (The First Battle of the Scarpe (first phase of the Arras Offensive) ), which was very successful and made (for the time) an astonishing advance of several miles. They attacked east of Roclincourt, with the Canadian Corps – carrying out a fine feat of arms in capturing Vimy Ridge – on their left. The Division had heavy fighting, but nonetheless met its objectives. (The Second Battle of the Scarpe (second phase of the Arras Offensive)).

After a brief rest, the Division re-entered the line on 15 April, and eight days later took part in another attack, this time near Roeux, where the enemy had strongly fortified the village and nearby chemical works. The fight went on for two days, and despite heavy loss, these places were captured. (The Capture of Roeux (fourth phase of the Arras Offensive) ) The Division was relieved on 31 May, and moved north, again to Ypres.

Headstone in Lochgelly Cemetery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas Hunter.

Private Thomas C Hunter, S/26912, 5th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders, Born Buckhaven, Fife, Enlisted Perth, Perthshire, Residence Lochgelly/Cowdenbeath, Killed in action 13th October 1918, Grave reference A.31. Avesnes-Le-Sec Communal Cemetery Extension, Nord, France. (There is only one Thomas Hunter, Seaforth Highlanders)

 

CWGC

 

 

Private Thomas C Hunter was awarded the British, and Victory medals, his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

 

Thomas Hunter was born 27th July 1895, in Wemyss, Fife, son of Alexander Hunter occupation coal miner, and Christine Charles.  Alex died 1951 Cowdenbeath, Christine died 1939, Cowdenbeath.

In 1911, Thomas 15 was living with his family at 3 Kirkford Street, Cowdenbeath, Alexander 38, occupation miner, Chris 37 married 19 years and bearing 10 children of whom 9 survive, Robert 18, miner. Agnes 13, school, Alex 10, school, Wm 8, school, George 7, school, Eliz 3, James 1m.

UK Registers of Soldiers Effects.

Pte Thomas Charles Hutt 26912, 1/5th Batt Seaforth Highlanders, Father Alexander received £1/12/0. on 7th April 1919, and £3/8/0. on 13th Sept 1919.

 

 

 

War Diary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frederick Hutt.

Private Frederick Hutt, 12705, Highland Light Infantry, Born Fife, Enlisted Lochgelly, Fife, Residence Lochgelly, Frederick Hutt died 1920 In Portmoak, Kinross-shire, No grave reference.

The CWGC record for Frederick Hutt not found, may be mistranscribed.

 

Frederick Hutt was awarded the British, and Victory medal, also the 15 Star. his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

Posted to France 12th May 1915.

 

Frederick Hutt was born 8th March 1878, Lochgelly, Fife son of Frederick Hutt occupation Baker, and Margaret Chrystal.

Fred 25, occupation miner, married Isabella Allerdice 19, Lochgelly, Isabella died 17th December 1974, Kelty.

 

U.K. Registers of Soldiers Effects. ( This page in the record is devoted to ex-soldiers )

Pte Fred Hutt 12705, Highland Light Infantry, Widow Isabella received £1/19/7. on 23td Oct 1920

 

 

 

Death Certificate.

 

 

 

Frederick Hutt, coal miner married to Isabella Allerdyce died on the 27th May 1920 at Glenlomond sanitorium aged 42.  cause of death, carcinoma of Jaw, Plithisis Pulmonitis.

Lochgelly War Memorial was unveiled 3rd December 1924.

 

William Hynd

Private William Hynd, S/25188, 4/5th (Angus and Dundee) Battalion (Territorial) Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) Born Cowdenbeath, Fife, Enlisted Dunfermline, Residence Lochgelly, Killed in action 16th September 1918, Grave reference III.F.13. Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, Pas de Calais, France.

 

CWGC.

 

 

Private William Hynd was awarded the British, and Victory medals, his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

 

William Hynd was born 1884 in Cowdenbeath, Fife, son of James Hynd occupation miner, and Ann Penman.  Ann died 19th May 1926, James died 10th April 1910, both Dollar, Clackmannanshire.

In 1911, William Hynd 27, occupation was living with his family at 15 South Street, Lochgelly, Mother Ann 62, widow, John 38, miner, Andrew 22, miner.

UK Registers of Soldiers Effects.

Pte William Hynd S/25188, 4/5th Batt Royal Highlanders, Bro John, Sis Isabella McGovan received £2/19/3. and on 30th Dec 1919 brother John received £3/0/0.

 

 

 

War Diary 4/5th Battalion 16th September 1918.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph Hynes

Lance Corporal Joseph Hynes, 137545, Royal Engineers, formerly 1800 7th Royal Highlanders 179th Tunnelling Coy. Royal Engineers, Born Ireland  Fife, Re-enlisted in the field, Residence Lochgelly Killed in action 13th March 1916, Grave reference I.A.28. Albert Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme, France.

 

CWGC.

 

 

L/Corp Joseph Hynes was awarded the British, and Victory medal, also the 15 Star. his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

Posted to France 3rd May 1915.

 

In the 1901 census of Ireland, Joseph Hynes 11, born abt 1890, was living with his family, Thomas Hynes 50, Mary 38, Martha 22, Christopher 8, Robert 1, Thomas 13, James Patrick 18, William J. 20, address Kilmurey Street, South Ward Newry. County Down. Ireland. (Mother Mary died 1936, Methil, Fife, Scotland)

1911 Census.

Joseph Hynes 19, occupation coal miner, was living with his family at 56 Hunter Street, Lochgelly, Mother Mary Hynes 56, married 30 years and bearing 11 children of whom 7 survive, Christopher 17, coal miner, Robert 11, school, John McQuillan boarder 6m.

Draft record.

Joseph Hynes enlisted in the 1/7th Battalion Black Watch 20th March 1913, he re-enlisted in the field 13th August 1915, promoted L/Corp 14th August 1915, in the Royal Engineers (179 Tunneling Company) Next of Kin Mother Mrs Mary Hynes, 41 Melville Street, Lochgelly, family, William 35, Thomas 29, Robert 19, all miners Martha 37, living with Mother Mary at 41 Melville St, Lochgelly, Killed in action 13th March 1916.

 

 

 

 

 

 

West Fife Echo 22nd March 1916.

L/Corp Joseph Haynes of the 1/7th Black Watch (Territorials) was killed by a rifle grenade.  He had a brother killed and one wounded.  ( Same entry in the Dunfermline Press 25th March 1916)

Fifeshire Advertiser 25th March 1916

TWO LOCHGELLY TERRITORIALS KILLED,  Intimation has been received- that members of 1/7th Watch have been killed in action. Their names are Lance Corporal Joseph Hynes and Pte. Andrew S. Wallace the latter being in the tunneling company. Lance Corporal Hynes has already had a brother killed and another wounded.

UK Registers of Soldiers Effects.

L/Corp Joseph Hynes 137545, 179th Company Royal Engineers, Mother Mary received £13/5/4 on 15th Sept 1916, she received £22/2/1. on 20th Dec 1916, sister Mary received £4/8/5. on the 2nd Dec 1919 Mother received £7/0/0.

 

 

 

The Lochnagar tunnel was started on 11 November 1915 by 185th Tunnelling Company RE, who had been brought in to work alongside 179th Tunnelling Company. They started from the end of Lochnagar communication trench, about 300 feet behind the British front line and 975 feet from the German front line. 185th was pulled out to go to Vimy Ridge in early March 1916 and 179th later took over the tunnel, loading it with two charges equal to 60,000 pounds of ammonal explosive. The mine was deliberately overcharged, that is with more power than was needed just to break surface, so that debris would be thrown over the German front line of which it was laid just short. It was also probably intended that the high lips would hamper German enfilade fire. It was not the largest British mine charge, as one of more than 90,000 pounds was blown at St Eloi on 7 June 1917. The Germans blew a mine at Vauquois with a greater quantity of explosive than the St Eloi mine although not necessarily the same explosive power. My impression is that the Lochnagar crater is larger.

 

James Hynds

Private James Hynds, 8307, 2nd Battalion Cameroonian (Scottish Rifles) Formerly Irish Guards, Born Ireland, Enlisted Lochgelly, Fife, Residence Lochgelly, Killed in action 10th March 1915, Grave reference Panel 15 and 16. Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

 

 

 

 

Private James Hynds was awarded the British, and Victory medal, also the 15 Star. his family would have received the Plaque “Dead man’s Penny” and scroll from King George V.

Posted to France 27th December 1914.

No Birth/census/marriage details found other than the 1915 Valuation Rolls where James Hynds was living at 5 Grainger Street, Lochgelly, Fife.

West Fife Echo 14th April 1915.

Intimation has been received by Mrs Hynds, 5 Grainger Street, Lochgelly, her husband private James Hynds, 2nd Scottish Rifles, had been killed in action at Neuve Chapelle on the 10th March.  Private Hynd joined Kitchener’s army on the 22nd December and was not long before being sent to the front, he being previously in the Irish Guards for seven years where he was Corporal.  When war broke out, he rejoined the army, enlisting as a Private in the Scottish Rifles although he was offered the sergeant’s stripes in his old regiment.  He leaves a widow and four children to mourn his loss.  He had another four brother’s serving in the army.

Dunfermline Press 17th April 1915.

Mrs Hynd, 5 Grainger Street, Lochgelly, has been officially notified of the death at Neuve Chapelle of her husband.  Private James Hynd 2nd Battalion Scottish Rifles.  Private Hynd who leaves a widow and four children, has four brothers serving with the colours.  An ex-member of the Irish Guards where he served for seven years.  He re-joined the army in December last year.

UK Registers of Soldiers Effects.

Pte James Hynds alias Hynes 8307, 2nd Batt Scottish Rifles, died at Neuve Chapelle, widow Mary received £4/7/1 on 2nd Nov 1915, and £3/0/0 on 5th Oct 1919.

 

 

 

Memoir Major D.W. Lloyd.